Last week, we shared a video featuring an interview with Harry Rossiter, PhD, FACSM, about a study involving mitochondria in muscle tissues and how this relates to the quality of health for COPD patients. In this video, Dr. Rossiter gives a comprehensive presentation to the  PEP Pioneers about COPD and exercise. You’ll come away from viewing it with a much better understanding of what exactly is going on inside your body and how your level of exercise has such a significant impact on your well-being, especially if you are coping with COPD.

Click the video below to watch.

Fatigue and COPD: Staying Active for Healthy Living
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6 thoughts on “Fatigue and COPD: Staying Active for Healthy Living

  • October 27, 2016 at 9:27 pm
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    Thank you for all the info on helping me to understand copd. I am 76 years old my primary care physican thinks it is to late to see a pulmontary speaclist. He has me on a nebulizer with vitals of alburetol 2 inhalers. Symicort and Spriva and Oxygen. I force myself to do all my personal things and to get in the car everyday and go somewhere I can walk. I live alone and do most household chores , I feel that I continue to push my self do a little sit down get up do a little more as long as I am moving I am incline to think it helps am I right? I am an ex smoker quit 10 years ago! Am I to old to try and get in any of the studies?

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    • November 8, 2016 at 6:14 am
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      Dear Gladys,
      Thanks for writing. I admire your perseverance. Keeping active is the best thing you can do for yourself. It seems like your primary care physician has you on most of the therapies that have shown to be useful in COPD. One that you didn’t mention is pulmonary rehabilitation, which might be of help to you in increasing your ability to keep active. If you’re lucky, there might be a pulmonary rehabilitation program in your area. Some primary care physicians don’t commonly refer patients to pulmonary rehabilitation; this might be a reason to see a pulmonary specialist.
      In any case, its never “too late” to take care of your health! You’re also not too old to take part in our studies. If you live nearby to our research center (in the Torrance area), let us know and we’ll have someone call you to see if you might like to get involved in one of our ongoing projects.
      Very best wishes.
      Rich Casaburi

      Reply
      • November 9, 2016 at 8:26 am
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        No , I live in Louisville , Ky, not close to the Torrance area. If you should hear of any studies in my area , would you be so kind as to notify me,. I will take your advice and look for a pulmonary specialist in my area. It is not about keeping me alive it is about the quality of my life. My daughters continue to want me to have help,… I believe even though I have to really keep pushing , I should continue to do things for myself, yes it takes me hours to perform duties that I used to do in minutes…… Thank you for all and any information you have provided to me. Thank you for answering my e-mail
        Very best wishes , Gladys Birk

        Reply
        • November 21, 2016 at 8:27 pm
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          Dear Gladys,
          Thanks for your nice note. Doing things for yourself is important…and satisfying.
          We’re pleased that you find the information we provide of help.
          Best wishes for health and happiness.
          Rich Casaburi

          Reply
  • December 8, 2016 at 2:49 pm
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    Excellent presentation. Informative and educational. I was diagnosed with emphasyma 5 months ago, although my X-ray was unremarkable. I have liveed at 6,400 ft in Colorado for 4 years and am thinking my low O2 levels are caused by the high elevation. Don’t know, but wish I could find out because I’d move to a lower elevation if it would “cure” me.

    Anyway thanks for the great info. I went to your website and found lots of good info.

    Reply

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